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12 October 2015

Custom Lowering the Lamborghini Huracan.

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If you’re passionate about your cars, we can pretty much guarantee that given the chance to modify one, the ride height will be adjusted. While a lot of the time this process is straight forward. Some can require an approach that’s a little more involved. Currently at it’s factory ride height, this Lamborghini came in to destined to leave again once it was a little bit closer to the ground. The factory ride height was measured and the customer agreed on a final ride height. Once those two things were established, it was time to get to work on the Lamborghini.

 

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With the Lamborghini sitting atop the four post hoist still at the standard ride height, measurements were taken to find the compressed height of all four coils. With this information in hand we were able to work out the rate of the standard coils to make sure they match up with the vehicles specs. It’s not uncommon to find Australian delivered versions with springs that are different to the rest of the world. Now armed with this information we can start to take a look at the coil over parts.

 

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The shocks were removed by the boys in the workshop and sent upstairs to the engineers at Bilstein Suspension Australia to be converted to a full set of height adjustable coil overs. The standard springs were removed and measurements were taken while they sat in their un-captive state, things like OE coil diameter, number of coils and free length were all recorded. Once all this information was taken, the spring tester was used to compress the standard coils back to standard ride height which was measured by the boys in the workshop previously. That made it possible to find the standard spring rate and with all this information it was now possible to to adjust the OE damper to suit the coil over pieces and the new ride height.

 

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One hurdle that had to be overcome was the front high-ride suspension that comes standard on the Lamborghini, as a lot of you would know, driving a lowered car nearly anywhere in Australia can cause plenty of problems. Be it a pothole, driveway, speed hump or even just undulation in the road, there’s a plethora of different things just waiting to make unfriendly contact with the underside of your car. It’s understandable that such a valuable feature like the high-ride would want to be retained, it gives the front of the car about 40mm of lift to help it cope with these sorts of obstacles. In saying that, the engineers really had their work cut out make sure that the high-ride system could still perform with the car sitting at the customers desired ride height.

 

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In order to retain the ride height adjustment, new spring seat adaptors had to be drawn up and machined to mate the OE parts with the aftermarket coil over parts. Every aspect of the OE spring seat contours were assessed before the springs seats were machined out of a piece of billet aluminium. This whole process had to be repeated for the other side and although the rear doesn’t have adjustable ride height, there were still no adaptors to mate the OE mounts to the coil over replacement parts so once again the engineer and machinist teamed up to sort out a billet adaptor for the rear.

 

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Now that the adaptors were finished, the engineers could dummy fit the coil over hardware to the OE units and assess where the circlip groove needed to be machined into the OE dampers. No mistakes can be made here, if the groove is placed too high the height will not come down far enough to match the customers desired ride height and not only that but the coil over hardware would also foul on the high-ride system. If the groove was machined too deep, the coil over hardware would be loose on the damper body and slip down the body under load. Not only that, but the deeper groove could also take away from the dampers strength and integrity.

 

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With most of the hard work done, all the parts were laid out for the engineers, and pieced back into the Lambo. The coil overs were fully assembled for the final time and then taken back downstairs to be handed over to the technicians in the workshop so they could be placed back at home under the Huracan. Once it was back down on four wheels, the final product only needed a turn or two to level up the ride height and no further adjustment was necessary, the Huracan was now sitting at the customers requested ride height with room to go up or down if need be. A few final tweaks were made on the wheel alignment machine and the Lambo was ready to roll, this time a little closer to earth.

 

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Photography  by SELECTNINE

 

 

 

 

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